Bad PR: Coming to a Twitter feed near you

Another day, another Twitter application springs up. And while Tweet Manager looks useful, it's also a somewhat dangerous, especially if used by PR agencies or companies  who know nothing about the web and social media. Or, worse still, think they know about social media. On one hand, Tweet Manager is useful for the prolific Twitterers to manage their accounts. You can auto-post a Tweet at a pre-set time, set up an autoreply (useful for holidays) and manage multiple accounts.

The latter is especially useful for people who handle several brands or feeds across Twitter - or want to perhaps split their personal and professional Tweeting, while the pre-set Tweeting could be very useful in certain circumstances.

But it's some of the other services that are, as Steven Davies, who first flagged this up, just asking for it. Namely mass messaging.

This feature enables you to send a message to up to 1,000 users at any one time. Again, there are times when it could possibly be useful (a major announcement perhaps) but it's essentially the Twitter equivalent of sending out a mass mail press release, and probably much more annoying.

Then there's auto-follow, where the application will follow anybody who Tweets a specific word.

This is already a pet irritation of mine - I've lost count of the number of people who've followed me (probably after a TweetBeep alert) on the basis that I've Tweeted a keyword.

Example in point. Not so long ago I Tweeted that I'd had so many emails in a day, my BlackBerry's vibrate function had caused the device to throw itself off the table. Almost immediately somebody who offered 'BlackBerry solutions and training' started following me. Thanks for that.

So, put them all together and it's now easier than ever for PR people to start spamming Twitter and giving the rest of us a bad name.

Imagine the pitch - a PR agencies pitches to a brand, with no real knowledge or experience of social media. They tell the brand they can set up an account on the hot new site that the whole media is talking about: Twitter.

Not only that, they can also make sure that they track everybody who talks about their product and then hit them all with targeted info (read: mass message).

Brand goes away convinced they've cracked the internet. PR then spams the hell out of people who just happen to have mentioned the word, regardless of it they have any interest in the brand or not. You can see where this is going, can't you?

Just *being* on Twitter is not social media. Autoposting and not engaging is not a social media strategy. They're fine for news feeds (which in themselves are quite a useful thing to have on Twitter) but not for a genuine Web 2.0 strategy. And mass messaging definitely isn't a social media strategy.

The sad thing is, there'll probably be a few PR people and.or brands who genuinely think that they've now cracked Web 2.0 because they're posting stuff on Twitter. And then there'll be those who know they're not but will do it anyway.

Ok, this isn't a Demya-type service - and I've no doubt that Tweet Manager was built with the best intentions in mind (and they ask users to use the service responsibly), and it does have some useful features. But we've already got enough problems working out how to fix email and PR. Let's not have to do the same with Twitter.