Come on PR, you can do better than this

Somehow, somewhere, one of the email addresses I use at work has got itself onto some kind of PR mailing list. How this happened I'm not exactly sure, but it's the only explanation I can think of for the sudden influx of assorted press releases landing in the inbox each day.

Given that the address in question is a PR address, I doubt they'll be getting coverage any time soon.

Interestingly, I've had a few colleagues and fellow PRs mention that they've been getting assorted press releases as well. There are clearly a few people out there in my chosen industry who haven't done their homework.

It's a tad depressing, to be honest, to see such bad PR first hand on a daily basis. I don't want to indulge in a round of PR bashing - it's not overly constructive for one thing - because I also see much more good PR than bad PR on a daily basis as well.

Nevertheless, my heart still sinks at the idea that there are PR people and companies who still think a mass mail out to all and sundry is an effective way of working. Sure, you'll probably get a bit of coverage but, by the same token, if you throw a handful of tennis balls into a crowded street, chances are you'll hit a couple of people.

Once, in a hurry, I did a mass send-out cobbling together a list from assorted sources. The pick-up was poor. I've since gone back to that list, made individual dialogue, established what form of contact and what type of stories they're looking for, and the response has generally been a lot more receptive towards whatever I'm doing. I know, bad me for taking the lazy way out.

In many respects, I have some sympathy for Charles Arthur and others who've been known to lose it on occasions with PR. If you're on several of these lists and constantly get an endless stream of emails, it can get very irritating. I'd never completely give up on emailed pitches though. During my full-time newsroom days, every now and then, amongst the dross, you'd find a little gem. Sure, it's not substitute for actually going out there and getting stories, but it always a welcome surprise.

It still doesn't excuse the arbitrary mail-out lists though. Part of me pities the companies who hire whatever firm it is that sends out these releases. The other part thinks that if they've chosen such a bad PR representative they deserve to see their cash go down the drain.

It's so easy to do lazy, bad PR (then again, it's also easy to do lazy, bad journalism). You wonder what they must do at work all day. Checking that you're actually contacting the right person? That surely shouldn't be too hard, no? I still wonder how this work email got onto the PR list. It's not exactly easy to mistake for a journalist's address.

Every now and then I consider emailing them back pointing out, politely, that they're contacting the wrong person. Then again, I've had somebody insist I was the right person and got angry when I pointed out I couldn't give his release coverage (reminding me somewhat of that woman from the Apprentice last night who insisted on arguing with the customer).

And then you occasionally get the truly impressive PR fails. Like today, when I emailed one of the random releases back, again politely pointing out they were going to the wrong place. I got an out of office. Ten minutes after we'd received the release.

Thankfully I know enough people in the industry who are doing inspiring stuff. My colleagues for one. Or the people I meet at varying networking events. But then it's always the bad examples that drag down the industry's reputation (justified or otherwise), and cause journalists to tut and sigh and roll their eyes and declare PR to be useless.

Generally speaking we're not useless. But when, as a PR, you get pitched with hideously bad PR you wonder how these people managed to land a job in the industry. Or if they'll still have one in a couple of years.